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The Crazy Years

My little tribute to Heinlein

This post is dedicated to the strange things I’ve noticed out and about; reality’s little inconsistencies, if you will. It’s a little tribute to my favourite Sci-Fi writer, Robert A. Heinlein. In the forties, Heinlein speculated about the future and predicted that the ’60s would be The Crazy Years. Well, it started then, but wow, we’re knee it ‘em now!

What are The Crazy Years?

Well, to make it brief, it’s a time period when you’ll actually need signs like “It is forbidden to drive on the sidewalk” or “Caution: Ice is Slippery (or the modern version on all coffee cups: Caution: Coffee is Hot)” because common sense and the capacity to reason would erode proportionally to population growth.

So here are my personal Crazy Years observations, because, honestly, some things seem very, very odd to me in the world we live in.

The Crazy Years by Robert A. Heinlein1) We get a “This program contains mature subject matter” warning before watching The Simpsons, but not before watching the News.

2) More people have killed and done evil in the name of God than in the name of Satan. Yet, God is considered good, religion considered moral, and Satan is considered bad

3) The more a right-wing politician proclaims his anti-gay points of view, the greater the odds he’ll get caught screwing a transvestite in a dirty bathroom stall.

4) A golfer having an affair gets more media attention than 10,000 children dying of starvation in Africa everyday.

5) We’re in 2010 and the majority of Americans still don’t really believe in Evolution.

6) Somehow, politicians think they have the right to state a scientific opinion. I.e.: I don’t think global warming is real.

7) Croupiers at the Montreal Casino get paid more than Montreal teachers.

8) There is a debate in the US: Is free universal health care a good thing for the population? And, believe it or not, U.S. citizens are divided on the issue!

9) Governments cut funds allocated for education but spend billions of dollars debating the definition of ‘Marriage’. Perhaps if they hadn’t cut funding in Education, this wouldn’t be so difficult a question for them.

10) It costs Corrections Canada $150,867 to keep a female inmate in a maximum-security institution for a year. (2006 data, Source CBC) Average income after tax of a single female in 2006? $26,000. (2006 data, Source Statcan).

11) The Post-Olympic 2010 Canadian Government spent millions debating whether of not to modify the lyrics “In all thy sons commands’ in the Canadian anthem because it’s ‘sons’ not ‘sons and daughters’… That being said, at that exact same time on the news, but less important, snippets really: teachers are striking, there’s no more room in hospitals, there are not enough nurses, not enough doctors, suicide rates in Quebec are through the roof, etc… Please, please, Government of Canada, perspective, perspective! Fix poverty, fix education, fix health care, fix the suicide rates and the homeless situation, you do that, and then we’ll talk lyrics, perhaps over a beer, eh?

12) “The Internet is free, it’s ordered, it’s calm and comforting. It’s my country. We live here. Why are so many people online? Because the real world is crazy!”

… (More to come! I’m sure of it!)

PS: If you have your own Crazy Years observations, let me know! Leave a comment!

PPS: A little tip, include your twitter handle when you leave comments! It’s a great way to get to know really neat people. Because, honestly, if you‘ve read this post you somehow found your way here… And admit it, you’re not normal. You’re neat.)

About Christopher Dorda

I'm a Sci-Fi Novelist. Author of 'The Price Of Free Will: The Singularity Cometh' I love writing and I plan to take over the world.

Discussion

One thought on “The Crazy Years

  1. Ok. I really like your observations. Really. But theck out these good news facts of our CRAZY times…from R. Brezsny:

    THE IMMORTALISTS

    Current human life expectancy, already at age 78 for Americans, is steadily increasing. Men now live an average of 27 years longer than they did a century ago, and women 31 years. Many scientists believe there is no absolute limit to the human life span. Some expect that by 2070, life expectancy will be 100.

    +

    CRIME DECLINES

    As of 2007, crime in the U.S. was at its lowest level since it was first officially tracked. Between 1973 and 2005, the violent crime rate decreased by 56 percent, while crimes against property shrank by 70 percent. The report comes from the Bureau of Justice’s “National Crime Victimization Survey.”

    According to the FBI, the years 2005 and 2006 brought a small increase in violent crimes, but by 2008, the rate had fallen even lower than it was in 2005. Crimes against property have steadily continued to drop. The most dramatic decline has occurred in the number of rapes. The frequency of that crime per capita is down 85 percent since the 1970s.

    +

    MOOSE LUXURY

    A Canadian moose can now walk in peace and safety all the way to South America, thanks to Harrison Ford and other celebrities with wealth and influence. They quietly worked together for years to purchase land along corridors that connect various wildlife refuges and national parks.

    Meanwhile, Canadian government officials announced that their country, the second largest in the world in terms of physical size, is creating ten giant national parks and five marine conservation areas. The new sanctuaries, when added to the existing 39 national parks, will double the amount of protected land.

    BLASPHEMOUS OPTIMISM

    “The biggest event of the last 20 years — the collapse of the Soviet Union — occurred without violence: the first nonviolent revolution of that size in all of human history, extending from Berlin to Siberia.

    “Nelson Mandela went from a prison cell to the President’s office in a country that evolved from white supremacy to power-sharing in only seven years.

    “The Internet more and more evolves toward the planetary brain once only imagined by visionary scientists like Teilhard de Chardin and Arthur Clarke.

    “What some call my ‘blasphemous cheerfulness’ or my ‘cockeyed optimism’ just depends on my basic agnosticism. We don’t know the outcome of the current worldwide transformation, so it seems sick and decadent (in the Nietzschean sense) when fashionable opinion harps on all the gloomy alternatives and resolutely ignores the utopian possibilities that seem equally likely (and, on the basis of past evolution, perhaps a little more likely).”
    – Robert Anton Wilson, rawilson.com

    more at http://freewillastrology.com/beauty/beauty.main287.shtml

    Posted by Mel | September 9, 2010, 10:17 pm

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